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Queensland leads employment recovery, says ABS

coronavirus

By April Murphy

The latest employment data released by the Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS) has put Queensland ahead of the states in the race for job recovery.

Treasurer and Minister for Investment, Cameron Dick, said Queensland was responsible for more than 60% of all full- time jobs created in Australia in February 2021.

“It’s particularly pleasing to see the number of full-time jobs in Queensland rise by almost 54,000 in just one month,” the Treasurer said.

Bjorn Jarvis, head of labour statistics at the ABS, said this latest data showed continued recovery in the labour market into February, particularly for women throughout Australia.

ABS

“The strong employment growth this month saw employment rise above 13 million people, and was 4,000 people higher than March 2020”, says Mr Jarvis.

Mr Jarvis stated that full-time employment increased by 89,000 people across Australia, of which 69,000 were women. Female full-time jobs were 1.8% higher than in March 2020, while full-time male employment was 0.8% below.

The statistics reveal that Queensland continues to shine, generating six times as many full-time jobs as New South Wales and four times as many as Victoria.

“Since January 2020, we’ve created 33,500 jobs, while New South Wales has lost almost 45,000 and Victoria shed 4,500,” says the Treasurer. 

The Treasurer states that Queensland’s strong health response to the pandemic enabled a more robust economic recovery.

Minister for Employment and Small Business, Di Farmer, said Queensland’s nation-leading employment growth results from strong health response.  

ABS

“Our Government is laser focused on Queensland’s economic recovery, delivering the skills and training Queenslanders need to gain rewarding, secure employment now and into the future,” says Ms Farmer.

You can find the detailed monthly and quarterly Labour Force Survey data, including hours, regions, families, job search, job duration, casual, industry and occupation at the ABS website www.abs.gov.au.

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